Friday, September 5, 2014

August 2014 Revenue by Platform

For months and months I have been trying to diversify my revenues so that I am not completely beholden to the success or failure of the Android platform.  As I reported in my July 2014 revenue report though, these efforts have thus far been largely unsuccessful.  Did the situation change any in the month of August?  Let's take a look.


In fact, things did improve slightly during the month of August, thanks mostly to modest revenue increases in my iOS, Web, and Windows Phone 8 businesses.  Look below for my commentary on each platform for the previous month and moving forward.

Android

Android has been my dominate revenue earning platform since the founding of Ape Apps back in 2010, thanks largely to it's easy open distribution model and it's widespread worldwide adaptation.  And while it is still responsible for a full 79% of my monthly revenues, August was the first month in a long time that actually saw noticeable declines in my Android revenue share.  Thankfully, this is largely due to gains in other platforms, although Google's removal of last month of WiFi Booster 2014 from the Google Play store certainly didn't help it's performance.  Still, my business remains completely reliant on the Android platform for it's success.  My ultimate goal would be to see my Android share at about 50% of revenues, with the other platforms combined making up the other 50%.  Given Android's market dominance though, this might just be wishful thinking.  We'll see.

iOS

August saw solid growth in my iOS revenues, thanks largely to the iPhone release of my farming simulation game My Land.  I hope to continue the iOS growth throughout the fall with the upcoming release of Ninja Level Up and updated releases of Level Up, Deimos, and My Planet.  I also hope to bring Alien Forums and Role Playing Forums to the iPhone platform before the end of the year.  With any luck, by the end of the year my iOS business should healthy enough to cover my living expenses all on it's own, in the rare event that Android should magically fade away into oblivion.  

Web

I love the web.  In a perfect world, Web and Android would be able to swap places in my revenue share, making web the dominate platform in my business.  For some reason though, people just seem to prefer mobile apps over their web app counterparts.  Such is life.  On the bright side though, web revenues were up during the month, thanks largely to the popularity of the web app version of My Land, available on Ape Web Apps.

Windows Phone

Usage of my Windows Phone apps saw some pretty healthy gains during August, thanks in part to the slow but steady rollout of the Windows Phone 8.1 update (the majority of my recent WP releases require the 8.1 update).  Sadly though, the actual revenue gains were not as impressive.  Windows Phone has a monitization problem.  The best advertising network for Windows Phone is adMob, but the SDK does not support the Windows Phone 8.1 update, so developers are basically stuck using Microsoft's lackluster pubCenter advertising network.  Now, I will grant that over the last month I have seen improvements in pubCenter fill rates and earnings, but it is still nowhere near the levels required to make a living with the platform.  I can only hope that Google will eventually update the adMob SDK to support Windows Phone 8.1.  But you know, it's Google.  They hate Windows Phone.  I'm not holding my breath.

Windows 8

Believe it or not, in terms of daily downloads and users, my Windows 8 business has surpassed my iOS business.  So why is my Windows 8 revenue sitting at 0% while my iOS revenue is at 12%?  Windows 8 shares Windows Phone's monitization problem, but on steroids.  My efforts to monitize using LeadBolt have fallen flat, and once again pubCenter doesn't really pull it's weight.  I am going to try placing Qadabra web banners inside of my apps over the next couple of months to see what happens (it might be against their terms of service, I am not sure).  Again, all Windows 8 needs is adMob support.  Again, Google.  

Conclusion

What can I say?  Things are going good for Ape Apps.  I'd like my other platforms to be doing as good as Android is, but all in all I can't complain.  I will keep working at it though, and we will see what happens in the future!

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